Credit

To engage in credit activities, a business must have a credit licence or an authorisation from a credit licensee.

ASIC is the national regulator for consumer credit and consumer leases under the national credit legislation.  This legislation includes:

  • the National Credit Code (which is in Schedule 1 to the National Consumer Credit Protection Act 2009 (National Credit Act)) – which contains requirements in relation to the entry into, terms and enforcement of credit contracts and consumer leases
  • the National Credit Act – which contains requirements for persons who are involved in consumers obtaining credit contracts or consumer leases (including both the credit providers and lessors, and other persons such as finance brokers) to be licensed and to comply with responsible lending requirements.   

We have issued detailed guidance and general information to help you understand the credit licensing process and your obligations under the credit legislation.

However, you may also need to get professional advice on how the law applies to your situation.

Information for consumers and borrowers on using credit wisely and managing debt is available on our MoneySmart website at www.moneysmart.gov.au.

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What's new

ASIC review finds unacceptable delays by financial institutions in reporting, addressing and remediating significant breaches

ASIC has identified serious, unacceptable delays in the time taken to identify, report and correct significant breaches of the law among Australia's most important financial institutions.  18-284MR. 25 September.

Financial firms must join AFCA now

ASIC warns all Australian financial services licensees, Australian credit licensees, authorised credit representatives and superannuation trustees that they must join the Australian Financial Complaints Authority (AFCA) now if they have not already done so. 18-275MR. 20 September

ASIC prescribes three-year period for credit card responsible lending assessments

Following consultation, ASIC has set a three-year period to be used by banks and credit providers when assessing a new credit card contract or credit limit increase for consumers. 18-257MR, 5 September

Latest credit releases

Last updated: 20/10/2014 12:00